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Is Inspired By The Natural History Of Bees

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The game begins when one of the players leaves the room.  When this player returns they begin what appears at first to be a private dance.  All of the other players then begin to copy and learn this dance.

The dance includes sequences of steps with knees raised to different heights, sequences of hand and arm movements, changes of direction, and a concluding passage of mime.  The dance is repeated and repeated and repeated until the player leading the dance is satisfied that all the other players have learnt the dance and are performing it simultaneously.

The players (except for the player who has been teaching and leading the dance) then leave the room performing the dance. 

The players return some minutes later carrying an object and place it on a table.  It is the object identified by the passage of mime in the dance.

Another player then leaves the room and returns to perform another and different private dance.  Once again, the dance is repeated and repeated and repeated until the player leading the dance is satisfied that all the other players have learnt the dance and are performing it simultaneously.  The other players then leave the room performing the dance.  They return with another object and place it on the table.

The key to this game is that every dance is a physical description of a journey.  The dance itself provides in some way a depiction of this journey  -  the doors to be opened, the changes of direction, and the paths to be followed in order to reach and then return with the object identified by the mime.

The game continues until all the players have taken a turn to lead a dance and until there are as many objects on the table as there are players.

Notes :

-  the nature of the dance depicting the journey will depend on the skills, experience, ages and abilities of the players :  the journey may be depicted graphically in arm movements, in a hand dance for the fingers, in images for the whole body, or in a step dance marking all the steps to be taken during the journey ;  the dance may define both the journey and how the journey is to be made (as a conga dance, for example) ;  the dance may also define the way or the manner in which the players are to return with the object to the table

-  Deaf players may incorporate BSL sign language into their dances, providing they make their dances intelligible to any players who do not understand BSL ;  where all the players understand BSL then this language may not be used simply to describe the journey, but should be used to create "signing dances" which enact the journey rather than just explaining it

-  the game may be played in a large or small building with a number of rooms or spaces :  it may also be adapted to be played in a single room or space, or in the countryside (the dance may zig-zag or spiral to its objective in a small space, or leap or stride towards its objective in the countryside) 

-  natural history note :  a single bee may return to a hive and pass on a location where pollen may be gathered by performing a 'dance' which is learnt and performed in unison by other bees before they take off for the journey.

 

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